Home / News / Japanese Space Probe Misses Venus, Causing A Setback For The Japanese Space Research

Japanese Space Probe Misses Venus, Causing A Setback For The Japanese Space Research

Japanese Space Probe Misses Venus, Causing A Setback For The Japanese Space Research

Japanese Space Probe Misses Venus, Causing A Setback For The Japanese Space Research
Japanese Space Probe Misses Venus, Causing A Setback For The Japanese Space Research

Japanese Space Probe Misses Venus, Causing A Setback For The Japanese Space Research

December 9, 2010 (Pen Men at Work): A Japanese venture, worth a whopping 190 million pounds, named ‘Akatsuki’ (Dawn), to orbit Venus has missed the planet utterly, notwithstanding which the scientists associated with the venture have remarked that it could be more triumphant when it passes by the next time in 2016-2017. The ‘Akatsuki’ was was initiated in May 2010 with the objective of scrutinizing the poisonous ambience and volcanic surface of Venus. However, the probe, shaped akin to a golden box, shot past the gravitational pull of Venus instead of making its way into it.



However, the probe, shaped akin to a golden box, shot past the gravitational pull of Venus instead of making its way into it.

The Telegraph has referred to the spokesperson of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Hitoshi Soeno, as asserting that the ‘Akatsuki’ will emerge close to Venus in nearly six years, which will bequeath the JAXA another chance for success. Masato Nakamura, the principal creator of ‘Akatsuki’, has voiced that a second endeavor is hugely feasible.

The ‘Akatsuki’ is fixed with two solar panels of the shape of paddles and five cameras to enable it to rake through the planet’s chunky layer of sulphuric acid clouds. The ‘Akatsuki’ was also scheduled to look for signals of lightning and energetic volcanoes.

JAXA had declared on Tuesday that the probe had decelerated in an effort to enter the planet’s gravitational zone. However, JAXA has confessed that there were communication difficulties, which led to the proclamation on Wednesday of the venture’s failure. Soeno has not definitively asserted the rationale behind the failure but stated that the probe may not have decelerated enough near Venus to be brought in by the planet’s gravity.


The Japanese governmental spokesperson, Yoshito Sengoku, has vocalized that Akatsuki’s failure was deplorable but that the national government would continue watching keenly Akatsuki’s situation.

Venus has massive quantities of carbon dioxide and temperatures reaching as high as 460C. The probe was to function in conjunction with the European Space Agency’s Venus Express, which commenced to analyze the planet in 2006. Al Jezeera has mentioned that propelling the probe into orbit would have been a colossal victory for Japan as the Nozomi, which was initiated in 1998 to analyze Mars, had not been triumphant as a consequence of technical anomalies.

The Japanese Hayabusa probe, which came back to the Earth in June, was in space for seven years. It became the first to amass asteroid dust.

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